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Belk raises $1M for Susan G. Komen

Belk raises $1M for Susan G. Komen

ATLANTA -- Belk, Inc. has raised more than $1 million for Susan G. Komen for the Cure to help win the fight against breast cancer.

The funds were raised through the company-wide "Pink is Our Passion" campaign held at the department stores in October.

"We want to thank our associates and customers for their generosity in supporting our breast cancer campaign, which has raised more than $2 million over the past two years for Susan G. Komen for the Cure," Tim Belk, chairman and CEO of Belk, Inc., said in a statement. "We're proud of our partnership with Komen and look forward to our continued efforts to raise more funds to fight this disease."

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Pink is Our Passion was part of a three-year movement to raise $3 million for Komen and its breast cancer initiatives.

The Melting Pot raises $80K for CHOA

The Melting Pot raises $80K for CHOA

ATLANTA -- After several fundraising campaigns throughout the year, representatives from the Melting Pot presented Children's Healthcare of Atlanta with an $80,000 donation.

Mark and Layla Gunn, who own and operate all four Atlanta-area Melting Pot locations, joined forces with Broadway Across America and Pure Imagination Charity to raise the money.

To show its appreciation for the restaurant chain's generosity, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta at Scottish Rite dedicated Examination Room 18 to the Gunn family.

The Melting Pot has locations in Midtown Atlanta, Duluth, Kennesaw and Roswell. Learn more at www.themeltingpot.com.

LOCAL PROFILE: Turkey Day Fitness Tips

 

ATLANTA – Next week marks the start of the season many of us look forward to, year round. People love this season, dubbed “the most wonderful time of the year”, for a number of reasons. For children it could be the toys and gifts they receive or the annual visit to Grandma’s house. Or for adults it could be the abundant holiday cheer or the abundant holiday food it's okay to consume for the mere sake of the holiday. For some, the holidays can be too cheery and many end up heavier than they were before they started. 

Was the holiday food really worth a holiday gut? Think again.

Many people struggle with this issue, year in and year out. Some go on crash diets before the holiday or workout until they’re fatigued to “make room” for their Thanksgiving Feast but Amy Henry at FORUM Fitness in Buckhead thinks they’re all “wasting their time”.

Take-back event yields 3,800 pounds of drugs

Take-back event yields 3,800 pounds of drugs

ATLANTA -- The third National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Oct. 29 was a huge success in Georgia.

Participants turned in about 3,794.35 pounds of unwanted and expired medication for safe disposal at numerous sites across the state.

This amount exceeded the weight of the drugs collected at the second event in April, which was about 3,509 pounds.

"The total number of drugs taken back in Georgia speaks volumes about the problem of unused and unneeded prescriptions, the danger they pose to the community and the communities' commitment to making prescription drug abuse a top priority in the state," John Comer, acting special agent in charge of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Atlanta Field Division, said in a statement.

Task force to arm parents with tools to prevent teen drinking

Task force to arm parents with tools to prevent teen drinking

MARIETTA, Ga. -- Despite being among the top three killers of Americans under age 21, many parents do not seem to realize that underage drinking is a major problem.

The Cobb Alcohol Taskforce is partnering with the PTAs at local schools to give parents an important skill set to prevent teen drinking. A meeting for all Cobb parents will be held Wednesday, Nov. 16 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Cobb Central Library.

Several local experts will give insight into this growing issue, including Cobb Alcohol Taskforce coordinator Cathy Finck.

"The brain goes through dynamic change during adolescence, and alcohol can seriously damage long and short term brain growth processes," Finck said. "The research is compelling, but more parents need to know about it. We hope arming PTAs will help get the facts and useful tips to more parents for saving teen brains."

Aames, The Pink Plumber Hits the Road for Breast Cancer Awareness on October 17

Aames, The Pink Plumber Hits the Road for Breast Cancer Awareness on October 17

Aames, The Pink Plumber is committed to pulling the plug on breast cancer. Since 2010, the company has donated 5 percent of its net profits to a national breast cancer charity. To honor Breast Cancer Awareness Month, Aames, The Pink Plumber is upping the philanthropic ante and donating 5 percent of its net profits to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Donations made through October 31 will go toward providing mammograms for under- and uninsured women.

 

In addition to its capital commitment, Aames, The Pink Plumber has taken its mission to the street. The company painted its 40-truck fleet bright pink, raising awareness about breast cancer and the commitment to finding a cure. On October 17, all 40 service trucks will take part in a drive-around on Interstate 285 to further bring attention to the fight against this disease.

 

LOCAL PROFILE: Sawanda Spinks, President of Georgia Pediatric Hydrocephalus Foundation

LOCAL PROFILE: Sawanda Spinks, President of Georgia Pediatric Hydrocephalus Foundation

ATLANTA – Sawanda Spinks was eight-months-pregnant when she learned her first child would be born with hydrocephalus.

“I had never heard of it; I didn’t know what it was but when I heard the risks, I started crying; I couldn’t take listening to that”, she said.

Spinks had gone into the emergency room for a pulled muscle but when she left her life was changed, forever.

Hydrocephalus is a condition that affects 1-in-500 infants. The condition, also known as having “water on the brain”, happens when fluid accumulates on the brain and in the skull cavities.

As any first-time parent would Spinks visited countless specialists, searching for good news, before she would give birth to her son a month later; she heard none.

“Doctors didn’t give us much hope but they were doing their job, they’re supposed to tell you the worst case scenario”.   

“We heard it all.